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Miss Lily™ 

An early Southern highbush with large fruit, good scar, color firmness and flavor.  Structure is very upright and narrow of moderate vigor.  Achieves consistent medium to high yields.  This particular variety has late flowering and a short ripening period, possibly mitigating the need for overhead frost protection.  New to Georgia and Florida growers alike.  Released by UGA.

Miss Alice Mae™ 

An early Southern highbush with very firm, large fruit.  Is a high yielding plant of moderate vigor.  Not tested in Florida markets.  Released by UGA.

Avanti™ 

A very low chill, early maturing Southern highbush adapted to production regions in central and south-central Florida (late January/February in south central FL) Produces well under evergreen management systems.  Firm, high quality fruit with small dry picking scar.


Primadonna 

Ripens about 7 days before ‘Star’.  It produces large, high-quality berries on a vigorous, upright bush.  In FL, it requires careful budbreak culture to induce spring leafing.  

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*Plant information gathered from extension publications, patents, and  Florida Seed Producers.


Springhigh 

‘Springhigh’ is a very vigorous and upright variety of southern highbush. It has a chilling requirement of 200 to 300 hours (below 45°F). Springhigh’ typically flowers about mid-February in North-Central Florida. The crop ripens early in the season, with most of the harvest in Northeast Florida coming between April 15 and May 10. The berries are large (avg. 3.0g/berry) and possess desirable qualities such as a small, dry picking scar, good firmness, flavor and texture. Berries develop in medium to loose clusters that are easy to hand-pick. In Northeast Florida, ‘Springhigh’ produces about 5 pounds of berries per bush on plants 4 years old and older.  

Chickadee™ 

‘Chickadee’ has a desirable upright growth habit and a nearly monopodial base. It is vigorous and has a good survival rate. Production of ‘Chickadee’ is advisable for areas south of Gainesville. It has a very low chilling requirement, with about 100 hours (below 45° F) being sufficient. It flowers early, typically in late January for North-Central Florida. ‘Chickadee’ is desirable for early market because it is a very early ripening cultivar. It has a medium yield potential, similar to the yields of Sweetcrisp and Scintilla. The first harvest may be expected about the first week of April in areas near Gainesville. The berries are large (avg. 2.36 g/berry), firm, and almost crisp. ‘Chickadee’ produces very high quality berries with a sweet flavor and low acidity. Berry quality is maintained on the bush longer than for most other cultivars grown in Florida. The berry does very good after picking and has an excellent shelf that makes “Chickadee” a commercially desirable variety. 


Farthing

'Farthing' is a vigorous, somewhat squat and spreading, bush. Production of ‘Farthing’ is suitable for areas of North and Central Florida where chilling averages about 300 hours (below 45° F). ‘Farthing’ is a mid to late flowing variety that produces numerous flower buds in high density. ‘Farthing’ has a very high yield potential (5 to 10 pounds per plant at 3 years or older) and a harvest season of about six weeks. A first harvest can be expected in late April and early May near Gainesville. The berries are high quality with a firm, nearly crisp, texture and sweet taste. The berries are medium to large in size, depending on the crop load, and suitable for the fresh or processed market. ‘Farthing’ has been hand-harvested, packed, and shipped commercially with no reported problems. ‘Farthing’ has an above average mechanical harvest potential compared to other southern highbush cultivars currently grown in Florida.

Jewel 

‘Jewel’ is a semi-upright, semi-spreading, southern highbush variety that is widely grown in North-Central and Central Florida. It has a chilling requirement of 250 hours (below 45° F). ‘Jewel’ is considered a mid-season cultivar for Florida. It typically flowers about mid-February in North-Central Florida. ‘Jewel’ produces a large number of flower buds but also leafs well in the spring. Its vigor is high, which allows it to carry a large crop of high-quality berries. The berry quality is excellent but tends to be tart until fully ripe. Its berry size is medium to large (avg. 2.1g/berry), its firmness is good to excellent, and its stem scars are dry and considered to be excellent. In North-Central Florida, the first commercial harvest date is usually around the first week of April, and harvest is typically finished by mid-May. 

Plant Varieties Available 

Miss Jackie™ 

Mid-season southern highbush with large fruit, good scar, color, firmness and flavor.  Achieves very high yields.  Not tested in Florida markets.  Released by UGA.

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Indigocrisp™ 

‘Indigocrisp’ is the newest variety to be release from the University of Florida. It has a chill requirement of 300 hours (below 45° F). When compared to other crisp-textured cultivars, ‘Indigocrisp’ matured earlier and has higher yields. The first harvest can be expected about April 15 in Gainesville. ‘Indigocrisp’ produces berries with very firm, crisp-textured skin, and a very high sugar-to-acid ratio. ‘Indigocrisp’ fruit may be mechanically harvested with less damage than traditional berries. It has shown incredibly high packout percentages (94%) after machine harvest. ‘Indigocrisp’ has also received very high scores in consumer taste tests, when compared to industry standards.  

Scintilla 

'Scintilla' has a vigorous and semi-upright in growth habit. It has a chilling requirement of 200 to 300 hours (below 45°F). Scintilla flowers in late January for the North and Central areas of Florida. The plant produces flowers in a medium density with the potential of carry a good crop load. In Northeast Florida, ‘Scintilla’ produces about five pounds of berries per bush on plants three years old or older. The berry is large (avg. 2.5g/berry) and has excellent color, firmness and flavor. The clusters are loose and easy to hand-pick. ‘Scintilla’ ripens about the third week of April. Scintilla has been picked, packed, and shipped through commercial packinghouses without problems.

Emerald

‘Emerald’ is a vigorous, upright to semi-spreading, bush with stout canes. ‘Emerald’ grows well in Northeast Florida, from Ocala to Jacksonville, where average chilling is about 300 hours (below 45° F). It is also being grown successfully in Central Florida, in the Tampa–Orlando areas, where average chilling (hours below 45° F) average fewer than 200 hours. ‘Emerald’ flowers in early to mid-February in Northest Florida, and overhead irrigation is needed to protect flowers and fruit from late freezes. Emerald makes numerous flower buds, and vegetative budbreak is prolific enough to support the developing berries, especially when hydrogen cyanamide applications are used. ‘Emerald’ has been a very high-yielding cultivar both in Florida and in the San Joaquin Valley in California. The berries of ‘Emerald’ ripen from mid-April to mid-May in Northeast Florida. ‘Emerald’ berries are large and firm with a dry picking scar. ‘Emerald’ berries have a mild, sweet flavor that is commercially desirable. The berries have been commercially hand-harvested, packed, and shipped for several years without significant postharvest problems.
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Meadowlark™ 

‘Meadowlark' a variety of southern highbush with a vase-shape (narrow crown) and upright growth. It has a chilling requirement of 200 hours (below 45° F). Meadowlark may be grown across Florida, as well as Georgia. ‘Meadowlark’ flowers with dense buds in early February in North-Central Florida. It has the ability to leaf strongly during bloom and carry a heavy crop. The yield potential is high for ‘Meadowlark’. In northeast Florida, it produces five to eight pounds of berries per bush on plants 3 years old or older. Berries are large to medium-large (avg. 2.4g/berry), depending on the crop load. The berry clusters are loose and easy to harvest because of its exceptionally long pedicels and peduncles. ‘Meadowlark’ may be hand-pick or machine-harvested. The berries are firm with a medium-small picking scar that is dry. The berries have a mild flavor with a good balance of sugar and acid which makes them desirable for either the fresh or processed markets.  

Arcadia™ 

A low chill, mid-season maturing southern highbush adapted to production regions in central and south-central Florida. High yield when grown in an evergreen management system.  Peak production in central and south central Florida during high value market window.  Large, sweet fruit with excellent survival and leaf disease tolerance.


Keecrisp™

A low-chill, mid- to late maturing southern highbush best suited for production in North-Central Florida and South Georgia.  Fruit has a “Crisp” texture with a small dry picking scar.  This variety may be suitable for machine harvesting of fresh fruit due to fruit firmness and upright architecture.  High yielding when receiving adequate chill.  Just released by UF for trials.


 


Rebel 

Rebel is known for its large to very large sized blueberries with a light blue colored skin. This variety is a Southern Highbush variety that is known to be reliable and vigorous that is very high yielding.


Suziblue

An early Southern highbush with large, very firm berries with medium blue color and good flavor.  It has a semi-upright structure that is vigorous with very high yields.  Planted in Georgia, this variety is new to Florida growers.  Released by UGA.


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Flicker™ 

‘Flicker’ is a highly vigorous, upright to spreading, bush. ‘Flicker’ is advisable for early-season deciduous production in Central and South Florida. It has a chilling requirement of approximately 200 hours (below 45° F). In the warmer climates of South Florida, evergreen production is a consideration. Flicker flowers early and heavily in February, even before Emerald and Jewel. Flicker tends to ripen in the early to mid-season (mid-April in Gainesville). It has a high yield potential, producing 5 to 8 pounds of berries per bush on plants 3 years of age or older. Berries tend to be large (avg. 2.41g/ berry) with high firmness, and a small, dry picking scar. Flicker’s good flavor and fruit quality make desirable for the fresh market.

Georgia Dawn®

Very early southern highbush with medium sized, light blue fruit with a good scar and firm berries.  The plant growth is upright with moderate vigor.  New to Florida and Georgia markets.  Released by UGA.



Endura™

A very low chill, mid-to-late maturing southern highbush adapted to production regions in central Florida. Produces well under both evergreen and conventional management systems.  Large and firm fruit with excellent color as well as high, season-long yields.

Patrecia™

Ripens about 7 days before ‘Star’.  It produces large, high-quality berries on a vigorous, upright bush.  In FL, it requires careful budbreak culture to induce spring leafing.  

Snowchaser 

Ripens up to 20 days earlier than ‘Star’, but flowers very early and requires frost protection.  It is highly vigorous but susceptible to stem blight.  Berries are medium in size, light blue, with good scar and firmness.  It is a specialty variety for very early markets.

Sweetcrisp 

‘Sweetcrisp’ is a highly vigorous, upright to spreading, southern highbush. It has a chilling requirement of 200 to 300 hours (below 45°F). ‘Sweetcrisp’ flowers about mid-February in North-Central Florida. The harvest season is approximately April 26 to May 20. Its berries are exceptionally firm, crisp, and sweet. The berries are medium to large (avg. 2.3 g/berry) with excellent scar. In northeast Florida, ‘Sweetcrisp’ produces about 5 pounds of berries per bush on plants 3 years old or older. ‘Sweetcrisp’ has a high machine harvest potential due to such attributes as its loose berry clusters, medium twigginess, and firm berries.

University of Georgia Varieties

Rebel 

Ripens about 7 days before ‘Star’.  It produces large, high-quality berries on a vigorous, upright bush.  In FL, it requires careful budbreak culture to induce spring leafing.  

Kestrel™ 

‘Kestrel’ is a spreading southern highbush variety. It has a chilling requirement of 200 hours (below 45° F). ‘Kestrel’ leafs and flowers early, often in late January. Production of ‘Kestrel” is advisable for Central Florida. Evergreen production may be a consideration for areas south of Orlando. ‘Kestrel’ has good vigor, survival rate, and yield potential. The berries are medium to large in size, (avg. 2.29 g/berry). ‘Kestrel’ berries are ripe about the third week of April. The berry quality of ‘Kestrel’ is excellent, as the plant produces berries that are plump, firm, and aromatic. The berries, which have a sweet taste and excellent shelf life, are commercially desirable for the fresh market. 

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